Lawsuit Alleges Students in MS School Forced to Attend Religious Assemblies

The American Humanist Association has filed suit against a ppi c high school claiming officials required students to attend blatantly proselytizing assemblies led by a local Baptist church. The nst a Mississippi public high school claiming officials required students to attend blatantly proselytizing assemblies led by a local Baptist church. The lawsuit alleges disturbing details. Students were not made aware of the content of the assembly before they arrived. The assembly itself consisted of direct Christian proselytizing, encouraging students to follow Christ. Many students were of course uncomfortable, but none were allowed to leave or choose a study hall as an alternative.
If these allegations prove true, the facts presented in the complaint point to an egregious misuse of public school resources and instructional time, not to mention an abuse of students’ religious liberty. Apparently, a video of the assembly was taken by one student.
But also, is this even a good way to spread the Christian message, even if it were permissible? A mandatory presentation before an almost literally captive audience?
I’m reminded of a truth recently tweeted by the Baptist Joint Committee: for religion to be vital, it must be voluntary. Most teachers realize they can’t force students to learn. Administrators and church leaders should recognize that they can’t force them to get religion either. More importantly, in a public high school, the law does not permit it.
it alleges disturbing details. Students were not made aware of the content of the assembly before they arrived. The assembly itself consisted of direct Christian proselytizing, encouraging students to follow Christ. Many students were of course uncomfortable, but none were allowed to leave or choose a study hall as an alternative.
If these allegations prove true, the facts presented in the complaint point to an egregious misuse of public school resources and instructional time, not to mention an abuse of students’ religious liberty. Apparently, a video of the assembly was taken by one student.
But also, is this even a good way to spread the Christian message, even if it were permissible? A mandatory presentation before an almost literally captive audience?
I’m reminded of a truth recently tweeted by the Baptist Joint Committee: for religion to be vital, it must be voluntary. Most teachers realize they can’t force students to learn. Administrators and church leaders should recognize that they can’t force them to get religion either. More importantly, in a public high school, the law does not permit it.
The American Humanist Association has filed suit against a Mississippi public high school claiming officials required students to attend blatantly proselytizing assemblies led by a local Baptist church. The lawsuit alleges disturbing details. Students were not made aware of the content of the assembly before they arrived. The assembly itself consisted of direct Christian proselytizing, encouraging students to follow Christ. Many students were of course uncomfortable, but none were allowed to leave or choose a study hall as an alternative.
If these allegations prove true, the facts presented in the complaint point to an egregious misuse of public school resources and instructional time, not to mention an abuse of students’ religious liberty. Apparently, a video of the assembly was taken by one student.
But also, is this even a good way to spread the Christian message, even if it were permissible? A mandatory presentation before an almost literally captive audience?
I’m reminded of a truth recently tweeted by the Baptist Joint Committee: for religion to be vital, it must be voluntary. Most teachers realize they can’t force students to learn. Administrators and church leaders should recognize that they can’t force them to get religion either. More importantly, in a public high school, the law does not permit it.http://www.bjconline.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=5572&Itemid=134

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