Churches and Affliates

World Vision

There is no hidden agenda for World Vision. As Ted Engstrom said, Christianization is their primary motive.

World Vision came to Sri Lanka in 1969 with a pastor’s conference in Kandy. A national office was established in 1977 in Colombo, the nation’s capital, providing ministry to the people through disaster relief, development programs, Christian leadership, and evangelism.

World Vision is an international partnership of Christians whose mission is “to follow our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ in working with the poor and oppressed to promote human transformation, seek justice, and bear witness to the good news of the Kingdom of God” (emphasis added).

One way of Christianization, as envisaged by Ted Engstrom, is through child sponsorship. Child sponsorship in Sri Lanka began in 1987 with 1,614 children. By 1990, there were 6,492 sponsored children and a total of 86 projects and 23,260 sponsored children by 1995. Currently, 61,581 children are registered in the World Vision sponsorship program. Several times this number of children and other family members benefit from World Vision activities. Of these registered children, many have World Vision sponsors in other countries. U.S. donors sponsor nearly 16,000 girls and boys. In addition, World Vision operates 26 development programs, six of which are supported by U.S. donors.

http://www.worldvision.org/content.nsf/learn/world-vision-sri-lanka?Open Accessed 20th July 2010

Four Square Mission International

Their primary strategy employs a house church planting method. As home groups develop, especially in the urban centers, these groups often become established churches. These “center churches” serve as bases from which workers are trained and deployed, establishing new groups throughout the nation. Today, there are more than 1,000 Foursquare churches and meeting places in Sri Lanka.

National Leaders are Leslie & Belen Keegel who have three daughters.

Read more: http://fmi.foursquare.org/countries/countries.sd?iid=102#ixzz0uOrJcXqV

Ceylon Christian Care is a Dutch charity foundation set up in 2003 and works in the East especially with the Tamil community who are Hindu.  Its partners are Word and Deed, Kindernothilfe and Church of American Ceylon Mission. It is involved in a variety of projects, which are mostly focused on orphans in Batticaloa and Periyaneelavanai.  In 2006 Ceylon Christian Care started together with Rev. S. Jeyanesan started the “John’s Academy” a Christian English Medium School in Batticaloa.

The children come from different religions (from the homes and from the area). This project allows us to tell about the gospel to all these children and also help to create a Christian educated community.

  • Children will hear about the gospel when they are young
  • This is the best age to reach them
  • There will be contact with these children for several years
  • Boys and girls can be reached
  • Through these children also the parents and family will hear about the gospel

A formal non-government organization has been established to govern the school. This project is under the responsibility of Rev. Jeyanesan. … Missionaries will be encouraged to participate.

However, CCC discontinued its relationship with Rev. Jeyanesan and the Church of American Ceylon Mission in June 2010.

http://ceylonchristiancare.com/index_files/ProEduEmsE.htmAccessed 20th July 2010

Four Square Mission International

Their primary strategy employs a house church planting method. As home groups develop, especially in the urban centers, these groups often become established churches. These “center churches” serve as bases from which workers are trained and deployed, establishing new groups throughout the nation. Today, there are more than 1,000 Foursquare churches and meeting places in Sri Lanka.

National Leaders are Leslie & Belen Keegel.

Read more: http://fmi.foursquare.org/countries/countries.sd?iid=102#ixzz0uOrJcXqV